Sally Abrahms: Freelance Writer / Editor

Focus: award-winning writer and expert on Aging and Baby Boomers for consumer and corporate clients. Specialize in Caregiving, Housing, and 50+ Work. Also content writer.

Clients: national magazines, newspapers, websites, and companies with products and services in the baby boomer and seniors/aging field as well as content companies. 

Blogging: AARP, the Huffington Post and Intel-GE Care Innovations. Guest blogger for Forbes.

In the Press: radio interviews on boomer housing with The Wall Street Journal (listen here) and CNN (listen here).

Fellowships on Aging: the New York Times Foundation and the MetLife Foundation.

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Sally's Blog

Actors Fake Dementia to Help Family Caregivers

A hospital program teaching family caregivers to be more effective with help of actors faking dementia

Actor pretends to have dementia

Presenting a caregiving program out of New Hampshire’s Dartmouth-Hitchock Medical Center: trained actors pretend to have Alzheimer’s, other dementias, or Parkinson’s in order to teach family caregivers strategies do a better job. Here’s how it works: caregivers are given a scenario to act out–perhaps coaxing Mom to take her medication, get dressed or change clothes. The actor is Mom and you are a frustrated and running-out-of-ideas adult daughter, perhaps. Or, you perform brilliantly.

Either way, the actors and fellow caregivers critique your “scene” and make suggestions so that when that situation really occurs, you have more effective strategies.

Here’s the piece from my weekly AARP blog

Training medical students to do a better job by using actors to play patients is not new. But at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, actors are faking dementia and Parkinson’s  disease to help family caregivers be more effective — and that’s downright novel.

Last month, 16 caregiver spouses gathered at the hospital’s simulation center to boost their communication skills with a loved one. These husbands and wives were dealing with challenging behaviors and wanted help solving real-life issues. In the process, the group also learned what it’s like to be the one impaired.

Each participant was videotaped in a pretend scenario with an actor (made up to look the part) who refused to get dressed, say, or was exceptionally negative. After the role-playing, the actors and fellow caregivers offered feedback on the caregiver’s body language and interaction — what worked and what didn’t. “Family caregivers are often thrust into this role of providing medical care without medical training,” says Justin Montgomery, a clinical nurse and nurse practitioner at Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s Aging Resource Center.

One caregiver in the two-session program was Myra Ferguson, whose husband has Parkinson’s. While she has had experience with the disease — her father also had it — caregiver boot camp reinforced her skills.

Ferguson was asked to play the sister of a patient/actor with Parkinson’s who didn’t want to put on a sweater or take her medicine. “My job was to encourage my ‘sister’ and tell her she could do it,” says Ferguson.  The feedback was positive — and useful. “I saw that I could be gentle and patient,” Ferguson says. “My colleagues liked that I used humor and made jokes to turn things around.”

Dartmouth-Hitchcock plans another round of caregiving sessions this spring and hopes to have more in the future. The training program is part of a federal grant through the Health Resources and Services Administration. “I was feeling really alone and lost before the boot camp, but it was like a support group for me,” says Ferguson. “It was also wonderful that I was learning to be a better caregiver.”

Photo by Charlotte Albright/Vermont Public Radio

Would this kind of program appeal to you? Thoughts, please!

Clients

Newsweek
TIME
The New York Times
The Wall Street Journal
Parade
AARP
USA Today
Newsday
The Los Angeles Times
The Boston Globe
The Philadelphia Inquirer

The Miami Herald
New York Magazine
Boston Magazine
The Congressional Record
New York Daily News
The AARP Foundation
Johnson & Johnson
Harvard University
Columbia Pictures
Huffington Post
The Atlanta Constitution

Citibank
JP Morgan Chase
Yale School of Medicine
Duke Medical School
Tufts School of Medicine
msnbc.com
Intel-GE Care Innovations 
grandparents.com
newsweek.com
forbes.com
A
dvertising Age

 

Ladies’ Home Journal
Family Circle
Working Mother
AARP/Workforce

MetLife Mature Market Institute

Transamerica
Encore.org
whatsnext.com
Second Act
PBS’ nextavenue.org
thirdage.com

Areas of Expertise:
Aging and Baby Boomers ›
Health and Medicine ›
Work ›
Education ›
Family/Pets ›
 

Award-winning writer specializing in aging and baby boomers for national and custom magazines, the web, companies, and organizations.

Print and Internet: features, news, Q & A’s, profiles, and ghostwriting. Author of two books, including a national book tour.

Corporate Communications: web content, brochures, newsletters, media kits, reports, executive profiles, marketing materials, advertorials, and features.

Check out my latest work for AARP, inspiring people age 50+ for TIME, and my MetLife report on purpose in later life.

Recipient of two fellowships on aging from the New York Times Foundation and the MetLife Foundation.

Blogger for the Huffington Post's new Huff/Post 50 section.


 
Clients

Newsweek
TIME
The New York Times
The Wall Street Journal
Parade
AARP The Magazine
USA Today
Newsday
The Los Angeles Times
The Boston Globe
The Atlanta Constitution
The Philadelphia Inquirer
The Miami Herald
New York Magazine
Boston Magazine
The Congressional Record
New York Daily News
The AARP Foundation
Johnson & Johnson
Harvard University
Columbia Pictures

Citibank
JP MorganChase
Yale School of Medicine
Duke Medical School
Tufts School of Medicine
msnbc.com
women.com
oxygen.com
grandparents.com
eons.com
jugglezine.com

Ladies' Home Journal
Family Circle
Working Mother
AARP/Workforce
MetLife Mature Market Institute
Transamerica
HealthyStyle
Civic Ventures
whatsnext.com
Second Act