Older Actors Are Taking To The Stage in WSJ

WallStreetJournal-logoHere’s a piece I wrote for the Wall Street Journal

Clovis Clark, age 59, is a professional nurse. But she also has spent time recently as a conniving, murderous sister and a madam in a brothel.

Her latter roles came courtesy of an Atlanta theater group, the Past Prime Players.

“I love this,” says the Ellenwood, Ga., resident, who has performed in dramas, comedies, murder mysteries, skits and monologues. “Acting is an opportunity to become someone else.”

Posted in Uncategorized |

Content Writing: The Benefits of Blogging

Why would a company that focuses on baby boomers and seniors–or really any demographic–want to have a blog? Blogging can be a powerful tool for businesses. Because I blog for many companies, I spoke at  Harvard Business School recently on a panel about the value of corporate marketing. Rather than repeat its benefits, I thought I would share a slide I created for the event.  It says it all!

 

 Slide1

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized |

How Wearable, Smart Tech Can Track Health for Boomers

Salvatore Angelone has gym equipment in his Fremont, N.H., house that didn’t exactly get a workout. But last April, the financial services project manager donned a “smart shirt” made by OMSignal, a technology company that works with fashion brands. “It was a game changer,” says Angelone, 52. “I’m in the best shape of my life.”

Posted in Aging and Baby Boomers, Aging in Place Technology, Health and Medicine, Work and Lifestyle | Tagged , , , , |

Dispelling Myths About Baby Boomers in The Washington Post

Who says baby boomers don’t like sex, are terrible with technology, are all rolling in the dough, are healthier than their parents and rottenly selfish? It’s just not true! In a piece I wrote for The Washington Post, I put these myths to bed.

Take a look and see what you think:

Posted in Aging and Baby Boomers |

In the Aging Biz: Entrepreneurs in their 20s, 30s

The age 50+ business is alive, well and thriving–and from unlikely quarters. It turns out many of those in aging in place technology designing for boomers and seniors are young whippersnappers in their 20s and 30s!

In a piece I wrote for Kiplinger’s Retirement Report, I interviewed a now 32 year-old. At the age of 28, he created a special credit card that protects seniors from scams and unscrupulous marketers. It was his fourth start-up! 

Kipling. logo

 

 

 

 To read more about these whiz “kids,” take a look: 

Posted in Aging Parents |

Aging in Place Technology for Kiplinger’s

With aging in place technology, seniors can stay home. Here’s a  piece I wrote for Kiplinger’s:

Most of us want to remain at home as we get older, but safety, health issues and social isolation can interfere with that plan. A growing number of seniors are turning to state-of-the-art digital tools — via smartphones, GPS, voice activation and sensors — that allow them to stay put indefinitely.

Posted in Aging in Place Technology |

How Baby Boomers and Seniors Are “Aging in Place”

 Bill and Betsy Owens recall the growing concerns they had about their house—built in 1876—in Powell, Ohio. They loved the 12-foot ceilings, the circular stairway and the formal parlor. But when the couple thought about the future, the home’s steep steps and narrow doorways meant “it wasn’t very livable,” says Mr. Owens, age 57.

So, three years ago, the Owens built an addition. Now there are no steps from the driveway into their new kitchen and great room. A control pad with smart technology turns lights on and off, and three-foot-wide doorways offer easy access for a grandchild in a stroller or, if the Owens should need it, a walker or wheelchair.

Posted in Aging Parents | Tagged , , , , , |

Boomer and Senior Housing, Aging in Place Technology, Senior Theatre

 

 

Posted in Aging in Place Technology, Creative Aging, Housing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Career Transitions After Age 55 Don’t Have to be Difficult

If you’re older and looking for work in your field or want to change careers, you’ve got company. Lots of it. A combination of living longer, the fear of outliving retirement, fallout from the recession, the need to sock away more for later or collect health care benefits, and the desire to make a difference is making work important.

According to a 2014 Merrill Lynch Retirement Study, 72 percent of preretirees want to work in their retirement years, and 47 percent who have retired have worked or plan to work. Boomers, it turns out, are starting more businesses than any other demographic.

Posted in Aging and Baby Boomers |

Companies Care About Caregiving

Harvard Business School talk on blogging

Why is blogging valuable for companies? I’m speaking at Harvard Business School this week about this topic on a panel about media today and in the future. (One of my areas of expertise is baby boomers—a jumbo demographic boomers are trying to reach. One way is through content writing like a blog on a company website.)

Check back later for more (after my talk) about why blogging can be so effective for businesses. In the meantime, here are three reasons:

  • Positions you as a thought leader
  • Creates a business opportunity to engage readers

Posted in Caregiving |

Caregiving and Technology: Can You Say “Cutting Edge?”

Technology allows caregivers peace of mindLots in the press lately about how technology is helping seniors grow old at home and feel safer, more socially connected and stimulated—and giving their boomer children peace of mind. I’ve written my share of stories on the subject, including one recently for AARP they provocatively titled “Is This the End of the Nursing Home?” about the cool technologies that allow people to grow old at home.

Posted in Caregiving, Health and Medicine | | Comments Off on Caregiving and Technology: Can You Say “Cutting Edge?”

Actors Fake Dementia to Help Family Caregivers

Actors Fake Dementia to Help Family Caregivers

A hospital program teaching family caregivers to be more effective with help of actors faking dementia

Actor pretends to have dementia

Presenting a caregiving program out of New Hampshire’s Dartmouth-Hitchock Medical Center: trained actors pretend to have Alzheimer’s, other dementias, or Parkinson’s in order to teach family caregivers strategies do a better job. Here’s how it works: caregivers are given a scenario to act out–perhaps coaxing Mom to take her medication, get dressed or change clothes. The actor is Mom and you are a frustrated and running-out-of-ideas adult daughter, perhaps. Or, you perform brilliantly.

Either way, the actors and fellow caregivers critique your “scene” and make suggestions so that when that situation really occurs, you have more effective strategies.

Posted in Caregiving | Tagged , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Actors Fake Dementia to Help Family Caregivers

Ageism, Advertising, and Being Married to a Celeb–Sort of

Have you ever seen the Dos Equis beer ads starring The Most Interesting Man in the World? If so, you know what my husband looks like. He’s a dead ringer for the actor who plays Mr. Cool. I wrote the story below, that appeared recently in AdvertisingAge, one night after yet more “fans” approached him.

I am in a bar in the West Village with my husband, daughter, and nephew. My husband David gets up to order a drink in the other room. “It’s happening again,” he tells us when he returns.

Posted in Aging and Baby Boomers, Older Age, Relationships | Tagged , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Ageism, Advertising, and Being Married to a Celeb–Sort of

Housing and Caregiving Updates

Just in time for the holidays. . .Five resources for parents and spouses with dementia and Alzheimer’s, then an interview about boomer and senior housing.

  1. The Alzheimer’s Association. Besides a Caregivers Center with educational resources, updates about the disease, a blog, and support groups, there’s a 24-hour helpline (TK), message boards to fit your situation and an online tool called the Alzheimer’s Navigator. It’s a five-minute survey that asks you questions about your specific situation, offers feedback on your answers, and helps you craft a customized action plan. The coolest part: it gives you resources in your local community.
Posted in Aging Parents, Caregiving, Housing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | | Comments Off on Housing and Caregiving Updates

Vacation First, Then Caregiving, Housing, 50+ Work

VeniceI’m back from Venice, where the museums, architecture, music and scenery are gorgeous. If you have a mobility issue, though, the steep steps on the hundreds of walking bridges are a killer. I thought about this as I saw older men and women, and parents with baby strollers, navigate with difficulty from street to street. Note to Venice officials: An elevator on those steps would be handy. 

When I’m not traveling to Venice on vacation ((did I mention Verona and Lake Como?), I’ve been putting in a little time on the office keyboard. Here’s a sampling of some of my recent pieces on aging and boomers for AARP, Intel-GE’s Care Innovations, and the Boston Globe Sunday Magazine:

Posted in Aging and Baby Boomers |

“If There’s Anything You Need”–Real Help for Caregivers

 

 

 

strategies that caregivers can use to get help from family and friendsYou know that blanket offer: “Call me if there’s anything I can do.” Guess what? There is! But you have to know how to ask to get what you really need. Someone can “help,” however, if you don’t need what they’re giving, it’s not really helping. 

Usually one family member–that may be you–ends up doing the brunt of the caregiving. But, no man is an island, it takes a village. You get the point.

You may be reluctant to request help from siblings, other family members or friends. This should make it easier:

So, why is it so hard to ask?

Posted in Caregiving |

Kids and Alzheimer’s: 9 Unforgettable Books

I’m on a best books roll. A 17-year-old college student got in touch to tell me about Why Did Grandma Put Her Underwear in the Refrigerator, a book he co-authored to explain Alzheimer’s to children. Max Wallack’s self-illustrated  story is charming and explains, in simple language, how the disease affects the brain.

He shows a kid’s perspective to Alzheimer’s and has activities kids can still do with Gramps or Great-Gramps. Wallack told me he wants to demystify the disease and teach children coping skills. He learned many when his great grandmother, who had Alzheimer’s,  lived with him when he was ages 6-10. 

best books for kids about Alzheimer's, one by Max Wallack

Max and his inspiration

Wallack appears to be every parent’s dream (let’s hope he has a few irritating qualities. . .) Half of the proceeds from the book go to support Alzheimer’s research and care of patients. While a student at Boston University, he works in the school’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center as well as BU’s Laboratory of Molecular Psychiatry in Aging.

He’s written academic papers and travels to scientific conferences. He was presenting something serious in California when I got in touch for an AARP story I wrote about him. Last week, I see he was featured on CNN

Posted in Relationships | Tagged , , , , , , |

Look No Further: The 10 Best Books for Caregivers

books for family caregivers

Terrific resources

My office shelves are bulging with books for family caregivers. Publishers eager to get their authors reviewed keep them coming.

There are so many excellent ones that it’s probably unfair of me to create a Top Ten list. But that’s just what I’m doing! 

The list is in absolutely no order of significance. These books offer coping strategies and resources, explain critical concepts caregivers must know, and provide the information they need to make good choices. They’re worth the read:

  1. The Emotional Survival Guide for Caregivers: Looking After Yourself and Your Family While Helping an Aging Parent, by Barry J. Jacobs
Posted in Caregiving | Tagged , , , , , , |

A Hot Housing Trend: Be Ready

Do you know what “aging in place” means? In layman terms, it’s growing old at home (rather than assisted living or a nursing home). Pay attention! It’s a concept that you will hear repeatedly as America’s 50+ population grays and baby boomers’ parents–and boomers themselves–need to think about next steps.

Ten thousand Americans a day are turning 65. In 2010, the population of folks 75+ was 18.8 million; by 2030, it will be 33.3 million.Add these figures to AARP research that shows more than 80% of people want to stay home as they get older.

Posted in Housing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Where Will Baby Boomers Live?

WHEN CHARLENE DICALOGERO LIVED ALONE in an apartment in Watertown, she knew none of her neighbors. “I felt lonely and isolated,” says the 53-year-old, a grants administrator at Lesley University. But since buying a $230,000, 700-square-foot home at Camelot CoHousing in Berlin four years ago, DiCalogero couldn’t be lonely if she tried.

Camelot is an enclave of 34 compact homes with welcoming front porches that sit clustered together in this rural town, about a half-hour drive northeast of Worcester. The road and parking areas are off to the side, while pedestrian walkways wind among the houses. The development is engineered to encourage relationships with neighbors — and it seems to be working.

Posted in Housing |

Is Home Sharing for You?

At the online service Let’s Share Housing, based in Portland, Ore., which provides a list of people who want to live in shared housing and homeowners who want to share, 80 percent of the clients are boomer women. Fifty-five percent of the women enrolled at the Vermont-based in-person matching service Home Share Now are over age 50. Online interest in the program has doubled since 2007 — likely due, in part, to many more people who have never been married enrolling.

Posted in Housing |

Is Multigenerational Living A Good Move?

Multigenerational living is a popular trend that helps everyone: kids: adult children; and their aging parents. Find out how it works and about its appeal

The Ng family from Hawaii

 

“It used to be older people whose money had run out who were living with their children, and now it’s the next generation that can’t keep up,” says Louis Tenenbaum, a founder of the Aging in Place Institute, which promotes “multigen” remodeling.

True, multigenerational families bunking together is hardly news in certain cultures. In 2009, 9.4 percent of Asian households, 9.5 percent of African American ones and 10.3 percent of Latino homes were multigenerational (compared with 3.7 percent of non-Hispanic white households).

Posted in Housing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Clients

Newsweek

TIME

The New York Times

The Wall Street Journal

Parade

AARP

USA Today

Newsday

The Los Angeles Times

The Boston Globe

The Philadelphia Inquirer

 

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The Miami Herald

New York Magazine

Boston Magazine

The Congressional Record

New York Daily News

The AARP Foundation

Johnson & Johnson

Harvard University

Columbia Pictures

Huffington Post

The Atlanta Constitution

Citibank

JP Morgan Chase

Yale School of Medicine

Duke Medical School

Tufts School of Medicine

msnbc.com

Intel-GE Care Innovations

aplaceformom.com

newsweek.com

forbes.com

Advertising Age

 

Ladies’ Home Journal

Family Circle

Working Mother

AARP/Workforce

MetLife Mature Market Institute

Transamerica

Encore.org

Kiplinger’s Retirement Report

The Washington Post

PBS’ nextavenue.org

USC

Areas of Expertise:
Aging and Baby Boomers ›
Health and Medicine ›
Work ›
Education ›
Family/Pets ›
 

Award-winning writer specializing in aging and baby boomers for national and custom magazines, the web, companies, and organizations.

Print and Internet: features, news, Q & A’s, profiles, and ghostwriting. Author of two books, including a national book tour.

Corporate Communications: web content, brochures, newsletters, media kits, reports, executive profiles, marketing materials, advertorials, and features.

Check out my latest work for AARP, inspiring people age 50+ for TIME, and my MetLife report on purpose in later life.

Recipient of two fellowships on aging from the New York Times Foundation and the MetLife Foundation.

Blogger for the Huffington Post's new Huff/Post 50 section.


 
Clients

Newsweek
TIME
The New York Times
The Wall Street Journal
Parade
AARP The Magazine
USA Today
Newsday
The Los Angeles Times
The Boston Globe
The Atlanta Constitution
The Philadelphia Inquirer
The Miami Herald
New York Magazine
Boston Magazine
The Congressional Record
New York Daily News
The AARP Foundation
Johnson & Johnson
Harvard University
Columbia Pictures

Citibank
JP MorganChase
Yale School of Medicine
Duke Medical School
Tufts School of Medicine
msnbc.com
women.com
oxygen.com
grandparents.com
eons.com
jugglezine.com

Ladies' Home Journal
Family Circle
Working Mother
AARP/Workforce
MetLife Mature Market Institute
Transamerica
HealthyStyle
Civic Ventures
whatsnext.com
Second Act